Publications & Presentations

Forthcoming

Book chapter. “‘I thought I made a vid, but then you told me that I didn’t’: Aesthetics and boundary work in the fan vidding community. In Routledge Companion to Remix, Vol. 2. Eds. Eduardo Navas, Owen Gallagher and xtine burrough.

 2013

Editor, with Andrew Whelan. Special issue of Media/Cultural Journal on “remix”. Publication 21 August 2013. http://journal.media-culture.org.au/index.php/mcjournal/information/authors#remix

Book chapter. “’We’re making our own happy ending’: The Doctor Who Fan Vidding Community.” In Fan Phenomena: Doctor Who, ed. Paul Booth. Intellect Press, August 2013. Check it out on Amazon!

Forum discussion, with Dianna Fielding. “Ethics and privacy in fan research.” Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies. Vol. 10, Issue 1. May 2013. http://www.participations.org/Volume%2010/Issue%201/16%20Freund%20Fielding%2010.1.pdf

2012

Book review. “Review: WikiLeaks: News in the Networked Era.” Media International Australia, No. 145. November 2012.

2010

Book review. “Review: The Uses of Digital Literacy.” International Journal for Educational Integrity, Vol. 6, No. 2: pp. 71-73. http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/IJEI/article/viewFile/706/532

Critical essay. “’I’m glad we got burned, think of all the things we learned’: Fandom conflict and context in Counteragent’s ‘Still Alive’.” Journal of Transformative Works and Cultures. Vol. 4.  http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/187/148

Presentations

New Media Regulation and Cultural Literacies Conference. Paper: “‘Fair Use is Legal Use!’: Copyright strategies and activism in the Fan Vidding Community”. Wollongong, NSW; 28 November 2012

Abstract:

This paper explores the complex relationship of a particular community of remix artists, known as vidders, to copyright law. With streaming video capabilities and the widespread popularity of remix culture, the historically underground vidding community has been forced to adapt to new conditions. In response to existing scholarship which portrays remixers and fans as victims of an unjust system, this research draws on ethnographic research to reveal community-based strategies used by vidders to mitigate the perceived risks as infringers of copyright. It will discuss vidders’ understandings of copyright law in relation to their work, and also their efforts to legitimize fan practices and remix as legal uses of copyrighted material under US law. The implications of the US-based activism for Australian copyright law and remix artists will also be analysed. Rather than victims of an unjust system, this research demonstrates that online communities have worked proactively to understand and respond to perceived copyright threats.

8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference. Paper: “‘Making My Own Happy Ending’: Fan Video Editors and the Creation of Emotion in Doctor Who”. Hong Kong; 19 June 2010

Abstract:

This research describes the online fan community of “vidders”, a group of (mostly female) editors who appropriate television and film content and edit it to music. These “vids” are a unique new media form that combine pre-existing audio and visual content in creative ways and often convey meanings not intended by their original creators and dynamically demonstrate the gendered reading practices of this audience. When the source material does not pay enough attention to the desired elements, the vidders craft their own stories using the footage in order to highlight the character motivations and relationships they find the most engaging. Using examples of vids relating to the BBC’s series Doctor Who (new series, 2005-present), this paper will demonstrate how these editors employ complex understandings of genre and draw connections across a text to alter or shift the emotional tone of their favourite television series to better suit their personal interest in the series.

2009

International Learning and Teaching in Academic Settings Conference. Paper: “Linking Internationalisation to the New Graduate Qualities: A Case Study from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Wollongong”. Co-author with Dr. Ruth Walker and Dr. Brian Yecies, University of Wollongong. Sydney, NSW; 23 November 2009

Abstract:

One of the flow-on effects of the recent AUQA preparation at UOW is to directly address issues related to the ‘student experience’ and to reflect on relevant best-practice learning and teaching approaches. There had been an implicit understanding that international students’ learning experiences would be covered by the umbrella of the new faculty and discipline-specific Graduate Qualities (GQs) that were launched at the University of Wollongong in 2008. This paper reflects on a project that scopes existing teaching and learning activities in the School of Social Sciences, Media and Communication (SSMAC) in the Faculty of Arts, in order to test how the new GQs are successfully intersecting with internationalisation issues and international classes. SSMAC encourages both staff and students to function in an international and intercultural context, which means developing specific competencies, knowledges and attitudes. Our project’s objectives are therefore to use SSMACs as a case study to do four key things: analyse and clarify key terms and concepts relating to internationalisation and the new GQs; use focus group interviews to scope out existing understandings of internationalisation by teachers and students; explore some important underlying practical and conceptual issues related to the teaching and learning experiences of both international and local students; and map best-practice assessment tasks and teaching strategies that incorporate intercultural exchange and/or internationalised content across the School.

Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference. Paper: “‘The best stories come out of frustration’: Fan video editors and the television metatext”. Brisbane, QLD; 9 July 2009

Abstract:

This research describes the online fan community of “vidders”, a group of (mostly female) editors who appropriate television and film content and edit it to music. These “vids” are a unique new media form that combine pre-existing audio and visual content in creative ways and often convey meanings not intended by their original creators and dynamically demonstrate the gendered reading practices of this audience. This paper will use examples of vids relating to the WB’s series Supernatural (2005-present) to suggest that these female editors draw on their extensive media literacy to make critical and playful commentary on television conventions in a variety of ways through musical choice and the juxtaposition of clips from the source text. It will demonstrate that these editors craft videos that better suit their elaborate, meta- and inter-textual understanding of a single television series. Drawing on semiotic theories of structure, this paper will argue that the editors extract the thematic/paradigmatic elements of the text and tie it to the syntax and emotion of their musical choice in order to create a new narrative which suits their interests as female fans more than the original source text.


Popular Culture Association National Conference. Paper: “Veni, Vidi, Vids! Fan-made videos and the strategic remix of popular culture”. New Orleans, LA; 8 April 2009.

Full paper available for viewing on Scribd. Please click here for the paper

Abstract:

This research describes the online fan community of “vidders”, a group of (mostly female) editors who appropriate television and film content and edit it to music. These “vids” are a unique new media form that combine pre-existing audio and visual content in creative ways and often convey meanings not intended by their original creators and dynamically demonstrate the gendered reading practices of this audience. This paper will use examples of vids relating to the WB’s series Supernatural (2005-present) to suggest that these female editors actively comment on, criticize, highlight, compliment, shift, and completely restructure mainstream media texts in a variety of ways through musical choice and the juxtaposition of clips from the source text. Drawing on semiotic theories of structure, this paper will argue that the editors extract the thematic/paradigmatic elements of the text and tie it to the syntax and emotion of their musical choice in order to create a new narrative which suits their interests as female fans more than the original source text.

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